TITLE

The Working After Cancer Study (WACS): a population-based study of middle-aged workers diagnosed with colorectal cancer and their return to work experiences

PUB. DATE
January 2011
SOURCE
BMC Public Health;2011, Vol. 11 Issue 1, p604
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article focuses on the study conducted to examine the middle-aged workers diagnosed with colorectal cancer and their experiences after returning to work. It identifies the barriers to work resumption, and the limitations on workforce participation. Further it evaluates the influence of these factors on their health. It focuses on the mechanisms people use to continue their working and how the existing workplace support structures.
ACCESSION #
65252667

 

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