TITLE

Bosworth Field, England

AUTHOR(S)
Lacey, Jim
PUB. DATE
November 2011
SOURCE
Military History;Nov2011, Vol. 28 Issue 4, p76
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article discusses the English civil war, known as the Wars of the Roses, and why it is deemed one of the most confused events in military history. It traces the roots of the conflict up through the premature death of England's Henry V in 1422, an event that left both the Yorkists and the Lancastrians claiming a royal lineage back to Edward III. It pays particular attention to a battle fought on Bosworth Field, located in rural Leicestershire, on Aug. 22, 1485.
ACCESSION #
65218569

 

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