TITLE

STRUCTURE AND GOVERNMENT OF THE AFL-CIO

AUTHOR(S)
Neufeld, Maurice F.
PUB. DATE
April 1956
SOURCE
Industrial & Labor Relations Review;Apr56, Vol. 9 Issue 3, p371
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article focuses on the structure and government of the American Federation of Labor and Congress of Industrial Organization (AFL-CIO). The local union remains to be the basic unit within the AFL-CIO. The new federation is authorized to directly issue charters to local unions whose jurisdictions are not in conflict with those of existing national and global unions. The convention is still the supreme ruling body in the government of the merged organization. The convention meets regularly every two years. Members elect the president and the secretary-treasurer.
ACCESSION #
6469193

 

Related Articles

  • OFF AGAIN.  // America;11/20/1937, Vol. 58 Issue 7, p158 

    The author reflects on the peace conference of the American Federation of Labor and the Congress of Industrial Organization (CIO) in the U.S. He stresses that they cling to the belief because it seems to them that the majority of the workers who have joined the labor organizations are not...

  • FOREIGN AFFAIRS AND THE AFL-CIO. Windmuller, John P. // Industrial & Labor Relations Review;Apr56, Vol. 9 Issue 3, p419 

    The article focuses on the role of international affairs in the American Federation of Labor and Congress of Industrial Organizations in 1956. The role of foreign affairs in the American labor movement is greater today than ever before. While still only a small part of the sum total of...

  • INDEPENDENT UNIONS AND THE MERGER. Taft, Philip // Industrial & Labor Relations Review;Apr56, Vol. 9 Issue 3, p433 

    The article focuses on unions that are unaffiliated with the American Federation of Labor-Congress of Industrial Organizations in 1956. Unions that have remained outside of the new federation may be classified as independent unions. Such unions constitute, as a group, a wide variety of...

  • DOCUMENTS. Reuther, Walter P.; Carey, James B.; Meany, George; Schnitzler, William // Industrial & Labor Relations Review;Apr56, Vol. 9 Issue 3, p458 

    The article presents the documents related to the completion of the merger between the American Federation of Labor and the Congress of Industrial Organizations (AFL-CIO) in 1955. Such documents include the Implementation Agreement, Resolution on the Achievement of Labor Unity, and the Report of...

  • The Tampa Sit-Down.  // New Republic;12/9/36, Vol. 89 Issue 1149, p161 

    The article focuses on the outcome of the American Federation of Labor convention in Tampa, Florida in December 1936. It is pointed out that there was no step taken toward the unity of labor. It is criticized for upholding the Executive Council's suspension of the Congress of Industrial...

  • Union safety & health department faces uncertain future.  // Industrial Safety & Hygiene News;May2005, Vol. 39 Issue 5, p10 

    Reports on the plan to abolish the Health and Safety Department of the American Federation of Labor and Congress of Industrial Organization in the U.S. Plan to merge the staff into the legislative department; Effects of the move on the delivery of health services to union workers; Role of the...

  • Leading from Behind?  // HR Magazine;Dec2013, Vol. 58 Issue 12, p37 

    The article discusses the role of more flexible, less-regulated worker centers in increasing organized workers in the U.S. Statistics on the representation of private-sector and public-sector unions at the 2013 meeting of the American Federation of Labor and Congress of Industrial Organization...

  • Union leaders confront political dilemma on supporting Democrats.  // Southern Illinois Labor Tribune;4/21/2011, Vol. 74 Issue 38, p15 

    Information about the AFL-CIO Executive Council meeting on April 13, 2011 focusing on the list of union's complaints is presented.

  • Work in Progress. McNeill, Jim // Dissent (00123846);Spring2007, Vol. 54 Issue 2, p71 

    The article discusses the state of the labor unions after the split of the American Federation of Labor and Congress of Industrial Organizations (AFL-CIO) in the U.S. According to the author, many feared that the split would create a conflict but the relationship between the two remains civil....

Share

Read the Article

Courtesy of VIRGINIA BEACH PUBLIC LIBRARY AND SYSTEM

Sorry, but this item is not currently available from your library.

Try another library?
Sign out of this library

Other Topics