TITLE

Dr. Kraus, I presume?

AUTHOR(S)
Pinker, Susan
PUB. DATE
April 2002
SOURCE
CMAJ: Canadian Medical Association Journal;4/16/2002, Vol. 166 Issue 8, p1080
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Profiles Canadian psychiatrist Daniel Kraus. His monthly visits to treat patients in remote towns in northern Canada; Thoughts on the benefits to mentally ill patients living in small communities; Biographical information.
ACCESSION #
6457564

 

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