TITLE

Conservative treatment of chronic Achilles tendinopathy

AUTHOR(S)
Scott, Alex; Huisman, Elise; Khan, Karim
PUB. DATE
July 2011
SOURCE
CMAJ: Canadian Medical Association Journal;7/12/2011, Vol. 183 Issue 10, p1159
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article examines the evidence for conservative management of chronic midportion Achilles tendinopathy. It highlights the effectiveness of heavy-load exercise as the only intervention with strong evidence in managing and treating chronic Achilles tendinopathy. It indicates that nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs have little long-term effect while orthotics may also help patients with an identifiable biochemical abnormality.
ACCESSION #
64569586

 

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