TITLE

The Venous Leg Ulcer Complicated by Diabetes

AUTHOR(S)
JOHNSON, ADAM R.; ROGERS, LEE C.
PUB. DATE
August 2011
SOURCE
Podiatry Management;Aug2011, Vol. 30 Issue 6, p157
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article presents information that podiatrists can use to effectively treat venous leg ulcers complicated by diabetes. A discussion of the causes of venous leg ulcerations, and of the challenges that are associated with attempting to treat venous leg ulcers that are complicated by diabetes, is presented.
ACCESSION #
64459094

 

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