TITLE

The Jicarilla Apaches' Ceremonial Go-Jii-Ya Is Part Relay Race, Part Harvest Festival

AUTHOR(S)
Hocking, Doug
PUB. DATE
October 2011
SOURCE
Wild West;Oct2011, Vol. 24 Issue 3, p22
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article focuses on the Jicarilla Apaches' ceremonial Go-Jii-Ya, which is part relay race and part harvest festival, in New Mexico. The belief of the Jicarillas was that holding the harvest festival led to cooler, wetter weather-good for crops. According to history, an 1855 treaty allowed the Jicarillas by the late 1850s to sell their pottery and basketry or preying on travelers in exchange for food. The Apache tribe continued to hold the festival since they got their own reservation in 1887.
ACCESSION #
64442796

 

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