TITLE

WHY MISALIGNED CURRENCIES MATTER

AUTHOR(S)
Stokes, Bruce
PUB. DATE
March 2002
SOURCE
National Journal;3/23/2002, Vol. 34 Issue 12, p877
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Examines the issues associated with misalignment in currency values. Implications of currency misalignment to international trading; Valuation of U.S. dollar; Problems posed by exchange rate misalignment.
ACCESSION #
6430504

 

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