TITLE

Scenes, Suspense and Character

AUTHOR(S)
Hochschild, Adam
PUB. DATE
March 2002
SOURCE
Nieman Reports;Spring2002, Vol. 56 Issue 1, p45
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Talks about scenes, suspense and character as the basic aspects of narration. Concept of thinking in scenes; Devices through which suspense can be generated in the story; Problems nonfiction writers get into when writing about characters. INSETS: 'Pick compelling charcaters. Think in scenes. Create...;Deliberately Withholding Information Create Suspense.
ACCESSION #
6413277

 

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