TITLE

Obstetric Anaesthesia Services in the United Kingdom

AUTHOR(S)
Taylor, Gordon
PUB. DATE
January 1971
SOURCE
British Medical Journal;1/9/1971, Vol. 1 Issue 5740, p101
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
No abstract available.
ACCESSION #
64098958

 

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