TITLE

A Love That Forgives

AUTHOR(S)
McKINSTRY, CAROLYN MAULL
PUB. DATE
August 2011
SOURCE
Guideposts;Aug2011, Vol. 66 Issue 6, p60
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
A personal narrative is presented which explores the author's experience of surviving the infamous 1963 bombing of church in Birmingham, Alabama, and later following the God's message of love, forgiveness and reconciliation.
ACCESSION #
64002086

 

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