TITLE

Mixing career care with child care

AUTHOR(S)
Timmer, Mary
PUB. DATE
June 2010
SOURCE
Grand Rapids Family Magazine;Jun2010, Vol. 22 Issue 6, p15
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article presents suggestions from academic advisor Dana Hebreard on how mothers can re-enter the workforce after taking a break for child care.
ACCESSION #
63889122

 

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