TITLE

Big Bad Bankers

AUTHOR(S)
Karabell, Zachary
PUB. DATE
January 2011
SOURCE
Time International (Atlantic Edition);1/31/2011, Vol. 177 Issue 4, p32
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article presents the author's views on financial reform in the United States. The idea that small-bank failures make large banks bigger which gives them more control over deposits and the industry in general is discussed. The author suggests that big banks should be broken up to create boutique banks and reduce conflicts of interest. The financial performances of Goldman Sachs, JPMorgan Chase, and Citibank are noted.
ACCESSION #
63594439

 

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