TITLE

Selling Techniques for Industrial Products and Services: Are They Different?

AUTHOR(S)
Dubinsky, Alan J.; Rudelius, William
PUB. DATE
September 1980
SOURCE
Journal of Personal Selling & Sales Management;Fall/Winter80/81, Vol. 1 Issue 1, p65
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article focuses on what selling techniques are considered to be important by salespeople. The objectives are, to identify the selling techniques judged important by those selling industrial products and services and to compare the selling techniques judged important in selling industrial products to those used for selling industrial services. The present study has presented a list of 84 selling techniques. This catalogue of techniques provides a useful checklist that sales executives can utilize in planning sales training programs. More specifically, by reviewing the techniques described in this study (especially those techniques salespeople judge to be important), a determination can be made about which sales methods should be taught in a sales training program. In addition, the checklist of techniques can be employed when designing training programs for both product and service and novice and veteran sales personnel. Also marketing a product can involve an emphasis on different selling techniques than when marketing a service. That is, because of the intangibility of a service, the same selling techniques used to sell a product are not always applicable when used to sell a service.
ACCESSION #
6349556

 

Related Articles

  • A THREE-STAGE MODEL FOR ASSESSING AND IMPROVING SALES FORCE TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT. Attia, Ashraf M.; Honeycutt Jr., Earl D.; Leach, Mark P. // Journal of Personal Selling & Sales Management;Summer2005, Vol. 25 Issue 3, p253 

    This paper extends the growing body of research in the area of sales training evaluation by proposing a three-stage model that allows sales managers to determine: (1) training needs for salespersons; (2) training impact on trainees; and (3) training impact on the firm. When all three assessment...

  • The Selling Orientation-Customer Orientation (S.O.C.O.) Scale: A Proposed Short Form. Thomas, Raymond W.; Soutar, Geoffrey N.; Ryan, Maria M. // Journal of Personal Selling & Sales Management;Winter2001, Vol. 21 Issue 1, p63 

    This article reports the results of an examination of the Selling Orientation-Customer Orientation scale to determine if the number of items could be reduced while still maintaining the scale's dimensionality and consistency. Analysis of a new Australian data set was undertaken using data from...

  • A new way to think about selling: Value for them! Gltomer, Jeffrey // Inside Tucson Business;1/10/2005, Vol. 14 Issue 30, p9 

    This article presents the author's views on the techniques of selling, particularly the use of "value" by salespeople. Giving value and adding value are words that many salespeople and sales executives use but have a difficult time understanding, let alone providing. Most people think that value...

  • The biggest fear of salespeople is not fear itself. Gitomer, Jeffrey // Enterprise/Salt Lake City;8/27/2007, Vol. 37 Issue 9, p8 

    The article offers advice on how to overcome the major fears of salespeople, which are the fear of rejection and the fear that the fee that they charge is too high. Particular focus is given to the fear over price. According to the author, all salespeople should have a believe that the value of...

  • Who's Minding the Store? Marshall, Michael P. // Journal of Personal Selling & Sales Management;Spring98, Vol. 18 Issue 2, Preceding p1 

    Presents a letter about sales management. Role of sales personnel and sales managers in such market and sales changes; Function of many of the firms or businesses that are paying close attention to market and customer changes; Importance for a firm to have a strong top-down management approach...

  • Count To 2.  // Sales Leader;12/4/2006, Vol. 12 Issue 20, p1 

    The article offers tips to determine whether a client is finished talking. To avoid interrupting other people while they are speaking, count to two after they finish a thought and before you respond. After counting to two becomes a habit for you, you will no longer need to actually count in your...

  • Quit Your Whining And Just Get The Job Done.  // Grand Rapids Business Journal;7/23/2007, Vol. 25 Issue 31, p21 

    The author offers tips for motivating sales executives when the market is down. He says an extreme attitude makeover is important. He adds that when sales are slow, big companies cut rather than invest. Sales executives should help their customers by giving them business-building ideas or sales...

  • Measuring Sales Potential. Kahle, Dave // American Salesman;Mar2007, Vol. 52 Issue 3, p15 

    The article offers information on how sales supervisors could measure sales potential that they could use to help direct the salespeople, and to make sure that the company's internal and operational resources are applied to the highest potential account, and not squandered on low-potential...

  • How to Boost Your Sales in a Down Market. Boe, John // American Salesman;Aug2009, Vol. 54 Issue 8, p26 

    The article offers tips for salespeople on boosting sales during an economic downturn. It states that salespeople should monitor their activities and examine how they spend their day. It notes that daily prospecting activity is the most significant ingredient in determining business success. It...

Share

Read the Article

Courtesy of VIRGINIA BEACH PUBLIC LIBRARY AND SYSTEM

Sign out of this library

Other Topics