TITLE

THE LITERARY ASPECTS OF BUSINESS WRITING

AUTHOR(S)
Francis, Henry E.
PUB. DATE
September 1966
SOURCE
Journal of Business Communication;Fall66, Vol. 4 Issue 1, p13
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Identifies the main elements of literary style and discusses their function in business and technical writing. Misconceptions about literary writing and factual writing; Literary aspects of business writing; Correlation of simplicity and content.
ACCESSION #
6322983

 

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