TITLE

Approaching Cultural Competence

AUTHOR(S)
COMMINS, JOHN
PUB. DATE
June 2011
SOURCE
HealthLeaders Magazine;Jun2011, Vol. 14 Issue 6, p61
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article focuses on approaching cultural competence in hospitals with non-English-speaking patients. In a typical month at Mercy Medical Center in Des Moines, Iowa, 6 percent of patients use a non-English language and interpretation services are requested for more than 30 languages. Having a diversity expert in the hospital helps staff find the right resources in taking care of non-English-speaking patients. According to the author, the staff do not need to be completely competent culturally in every nationality.
ACCESSION #
63175662

 

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