TITLE

Everyday Scholars: Framing Informal Learning in Terms of Academic Disciplines and Skills

AUTHOR(S)
Jubas, Kaela
PUB. DATE
August 2011
SOURCE
Adult Education Quarterly;Aug2011, Vol. 61 Issue 3, p225
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
This article discusses shopping, especially critical shopping, as a process of informal and incidental adult learning about the intersecting politics of globalization and consumption. The author uses academic skills and disciplines as a metaphor to respond to an emerging conceptual question: To what extent can formality, informality, and incidentalism be seen as aspects of adult learning? The author conceptualizes learning as a holistic process, with emotional, spiritual, and intellectual dimensions, and identifies five themes that illustrate how the multidimensional learning in an everyday process such as shopping incorporates all three aspects. These themes are referred to as learning to learn, learning to do research, learning to develop a philosophy of shopping, learning to build a shopping-related literacy, and learning to construct a shopper's geography. This metaphor helps convey the depth and breadth of everyday learning and blur the conceptual distinction between formal and informal or incidental learning.
ACCESSION #
63150825

 

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