TITLE

The role of individual characteristics and judgment pattern in attitude toward euthanasia

AUTHOR(S)
Aghababaei, Nasser; Hatami, Javad; Rostami, Reza
PUB. DATE
March 2011
SOURCE
Iranian Journal of Critical Care Nursing;Spring2011, Vol. 4 Issue 1, p23
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Introduction: While euthanasia is the most controversial subject in end-of-life care field, there is very little available information about psychological correlations of attitude towards it particularly in Iran. The present study aimed "to assess the acceptance rate of euthanasia and evaluate the role of personality and religious variables in attitudes towards euthanasia". Methods: This was a descriptive-analytical study on 233 students of Tehran University. The data collection tools included the following questionnaires: euthanasia acceptance, euthanasia attitude scale, five-factor personality models and religious orientation scale. Furthermore, the participants studied the "Trolley Scenario" and judged about it. The data were analyzed using software SPSS and descriptive and inferential statistics including frequency, t-test, correlation and regression. Results: The results indicated that 63.9% and 58.8% of the participants were opposed with active and passive euthanasia, respectively. The opposition rate with active euthanasia was more than the opposition rate with passive one (p<0.05). Sex and age of the participants had no association with acceptance of euthanasia and attitude towards it. Among the personality and religious variables, only the religious variables were associated (negatively) with attitude towards euthanasia. Besides, the judgment pattern of the pros and cons of euthanasia had not so much difference. Conclusion: According to the study findings, the majority of the Iranian students were opposed with euthanasia and their opposition with active euthanasia was more than that of the passive one. The role of religiosity in opposition with euthanasia was not affected by the personality factors. The findings of the present study in addition to emphasizing the difference of active and passive euthanasia, weakly supported the slippery slope argument.
ACCESSION #
62092733

 

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