TITLE

Time course of temperature effects on cardiovascular mortality in Brisbane, Australia

AUTHOR(S)
Weiwei Yu; Wenbiao Hu; Mengersen, Kerrie; Yuming Guo; Xiaochuan Pan; Connell, Des; Shilu Tong
PUB. DATE
July 2011
SOURCE
Heart;Jul2011, Vol. 97 Issue 13, p1089
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Objective To quantify the lagged effects of mean temperature on deaths from cardiovascular diseases in Brisbane, Australia. Design Polynomial distributed lag models were used to assess the percentage increase in mortality up to 30 days associated with an increase (or decrease) of 1°C above (or below) the threshold temperature. Setting Brisbane, Australia. Patients 22 805 cardiovascular deaths registered between 1996 and 2004. Main outcome measures Deaths from cardiovascular diseases. Results The results show a longer lagged effect in cold days and a shorter lagged effect in hot days. For the hot effect, a statistically significant association was observed only for lag 0 -- 1 days. The percentage increase in mortality was found to be 3.7% (95% CI 0.4% to 7.1%) for people aged ≥65 years and 3.5% (95% CI 0.4% to 6.7%) for all ages associated with an increase of 1°C above the threshold temperature of 24°C. For the cold effect, a significant effect of temperature was found for 10 -- 15 lag days. The percentage estimates for older people and all ages were 3.1 % (95% CI 0.7% to 5.7%) and 2.8% (95% CI 0.5% to 5.1%), respectively, with a decrease of 1°C below the threshold temperature of 24°C.
ACCESSION #
61892170

 

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