TITLE

Chapter 5. Learning and Teaching Invasion-Game Tactics in 4th Grade: Introduction and Theoretical Perspective

AUTHOR(S)
Rovegno, Inez; Nevett, Michael; Babiarz, Matthew
PUB. DATE
July 2001
SOURCE
Journal of Teaching in Physical Education;Jul2001, Vol. 20 Issue 4, p341
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Focuses on the description of teaching and learning tactics among elementary children. Implication for cognitive learning; Interaction among team members; Dimension of the school work.
ACCESSION #
6154258

 

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