TITLE

Measurement of D-dimer as aid in risk evaluation of VTE in elderly patients hospitalized for acute illness: A prospective, multicenter study in China

AUTHOR(S)
Jin Fan; Xiaoying Li; Youqin Cheng; Chen Yao; Nanshan Zhong
PUB. DATE
April 2011
SOURCE
Clinical & Investigative Medicine;Apr2011, Vol. 34 Issue 2, pE96
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Purpose: Advanced age and hospitalization are associated with increasing risk of venous thromboembolic (VTE) events. The aim of this study was to investigate whether elevated D-dimer levels could predict VTE events in elderly patients hospitalized for acute illness. Methods: 458 consecutive patients (65% men; mean age, 77 ± 7 years) who were older than 60 years, immobilized for " 3 days, and hospitalized for heart failure, respiratory failure, acute ischemic stroke, or acute infectious disease without pharmacological prophylaxis or recent major surgery, were enrolled. Elevated D-dimer levels were defined as > 500 ng/ ml. VTE events included symptomatic VTE within 90 days or asymptomatic deep venous thrombosis screened by compression ultrasonography at enrollment and 3-week follow-up. The association between baseline D-dimer levels and subsequent VTE events, adjusted for age, sex, ethnicity, body mass index, co-morbidities, and acute disease status, was assessed using multivariate Cox proportional hazard models. Results: 49.1% (n = 225) of patients had elevated baseline D-dimer levels, and of these patients, 14.2% (n = 32) developed VTE during the 90-day follow-up. In contrast, only 5.6% (n = 13) of patients with normal D-dimer levels developed VTE. Multivariate analysis showed that patients with elevated D-dimer levels had a 3.2-fold increased risk of developing VTE (95% confidence interval, 1.5-6.5; P = 0.002) in comparison with patients with normal levels. Conclusions: In elderly patients who were hospitalized for acute medical illness, elevated D-dimer levels are associated with subsequent VTE events. Our data suggest that measurement of D-dimer, a widely-performed objective test, may help clinicians address highrisk individuals for VTE.
ACCESSION #
61263468

 

Related Articles

Share

Read the Article

Courtesy of THE LIBRARY OF VIRGINIA

Sorry, but this item is not currently available from your library.

Try another library?
Sign out of this library

Other Topics