TITLE

Prior intense exercise reduces arterial carbon dioxide pressure in extreme obesity

AUTHOR(S)
Zavorsky, Gerald S.; Kim, Do Jun; Cass, Lauren M.; Carli, Franco
PUB. DATE
October 2010
SOURCE
Clinical & Investigative Medicine;Oct2010, Vol. 33 Issue 5, pE321
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Purpose: Unlike normal weight individuals, individuals with extreme obesity do not show a decrease in arterial carbon dioxide pressure (PaCO2) from rest to peak exercise. This indicates that breathing is compromised. The objective of this study was to determine if prior high intensity exercise lowers PaCO2 in comparison with a first bout, normalized for the same metabolic rate. Methods: Oxygen consumption during incremental, ramped exercise was matched to constant workload exercise (75% of peak power). Both protocols were to volitional exhaustion 39 ± 8 min apart. Eleven obese subjects (BMI = 47 ± 8 kg/m2, aerobic capacity = 2.3 ± 0.6 L/min) were evaluated. Forty paired samples were obtained at the same metabolic rate between the two protocols. Results: The mean absolute difference and 95% CI were large for arterial oxygen pressure (PaO2) = 9 (6, 11) mmHg and alveolar to arterial oxygen pressure difference (Aa- DO2) = 7 (5, 8) mmHg. The mean absolute difference for arterial oxyhemoglobin saturation (%SaO2) = 0.5 (0.4, 0.7)%; PaCO2 = 4 (3, 4) mmHg; physiological dead space to tidal volume ratio (VD/VT) = 0.04 (0.03, 0.05); and alveolar ventilation (VA) = 3 (2, 4) L/min. The recovery period after the first bout of exercise reduced the PaCO2 by 3 mmHg when matched for similar metabolic rates. Constant workload exercise predicted VA, %SaO2, VD/VT, and PaCO2, but not PaO2 or AaDO2 during incremental exercise at similar metabolic rates. Conclusion: Given a sufficient chemical stimulus, obese subjects will attempt to breathe more, although this does not mean more VA, which removes CO2.
ACCESSION #
61180824

 

Related Articles

  • Ventilatory responses to prolonged exercise with heavy load carriage. Phillips, Devin; Stickland, Michael; Petersen, Stewart; Phillips, Devin B; Stickland, Michael K; Petersen, Stewart R // European Journal of Applied Physiology;Jan2016, Vol. 116 Issue 1, p19 

    Purpose: The purpose of this experiment was to study breathing pattern and operating lung volume during 45 min of exercise with a heavy backpack (25 kg) and examine the effect of this exercise on respiratory muscle strength.Methods: Fifteen males completed randomly...

  • the science of breathing. LEVINE, JESSICA // Yoga Journal;Aug2015, p80 

    The article focuses on the scientific explanation on the benefits of proper breathing and yoga in delivering healthy mind and body. Insights from several medical professors and yoga instructors including Roger Cole of Del Mar California, Sat Bir Singh Khalsa of Harvard Medical School, and...

  • RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN BLOOD LACTATE AND HYPERVENTILATION DURING HIGH-INTENSITY CONSTANT-LOAD EXERCISE IN HEAT. Chiba, T.; Ishii, H.; Takahashi, S.; Yano, T. // Biology of Sport;2011, Vol. 28 Issue 3, p159 

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between hyperventilation and increase in blood lactate during high-intensity constant-load exercise in heat and normal conditions. Seven male volunteers exercised for 10 min on a cycle ergometer at 80%V̇O2max in heat (40°C, 50%...

  • Effects of breathing patterns and light exercise on linear and nonlinear heart rate variability. Weippert, Matthias; Behrens, Kristin; Rieger, Annika; Kumar, Mohit; Behrens, Martin // Applied Physiology, Nutrition & Metabolism;Aug2015, Vol. 40 Issue 8, p762 

    Despite their use in cardiac risk stratification, the physiological meaning of nonlinear heart rate variability (HRV) measures is not well understood. The aim of this study was to elucidate effects of breathing frequency, tidal volume, and light exercise on nonlinear HRV and to determine...

  • Acute Responses of Functional Electrical Stimulation Cycling on the Ventilation-to-CO2 Production Ratio and Substrate Utilization After Spinal Cord Injury. Gorgey, Ashraf S.; Lawrence, Justin // PM & R: Journal of Injury, Function & Rehabilitation;Mar2016, Vol. 8 Issue 3, p225 

    Background: Ventilation-to-carbon dioxide ratio is comparable with peak oxygen uptake in the prognosis of cardiovascular disorders. Currently, there are no established indices to determine the submaximal effects of functional electrical stimulation on cardiovascular performance in...

  • Stair Climbing Test Streamlines the Evaluation of Nonmalignant Lung Resection Candidates. Bernasconi, Maurizio; Diacon, andreas H.; Koegelenberg, Coenraad F.N. // Respiration;Jan2016, Vol. 91 Issue 1, p87 

    No abstract available © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel

  • BREATHING LESSONS. GAzzola, Alex // Foods Matter (USA);May2008, p8 

    The article offers proper breathing lessons. To achieve proper breathing, one needs to breathe from the abdomen to obtain proper respiratory cycle. One can place two fingers on the lower abdominal to encourage long-term healthy breathing for this exercise retrains the body in accepting the...

  • Función pulmonar y obesidad. Carpió, Carlos; Santiago, Ana; García de Lorenzo, Abelardo; Álvarez-Sala, Rodolfo // Nutricion Hospitalaria;nov2014, Vol. 30 Issue 5, p1054 

    Excess bodyweight has an important impact on the physiology of breathing. In fact, it affects resting lung volumes and exercise capacity. These effects appear as a consequence of ventilatory and inflammatory changes commonly associated to obesity. As a result, obese individuals have a rapid and...

  • Peak VO2 in Obesity: Is It Worth the Effort? Aubert, John-David // Respiration;Dec2017, Vol. 94 Issue 6, p486 

    An introduction is presented in which the editor discusses regarding the oxygen consumption in human body which are low among obese people creating respiratory problems.

Share

Read the Article

Courtesy of THE LIBRARY OF VIRGINIA

Sorry, but this item is not currently available from your library.

Try another library?
Sign out of this library

Other Topics