TITLE

Human Rights

PUB. DATE
July 2008
SOURCE
Burma (Myanmar) Country Review;2008, p42
SOURCE TYPE
Country Report
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article focuses on the state of human rights in Burma. It states that Burma, which is ruled by the State Peace and Development Council (SPDC), restricts citizen's rights on freedom of speech, association, and political movements. It mentions the country's failure to comply with the international standard of human rights norms and laws. Key facts about Burma including internally displaced people, population living on a dollar per day, and unemployment rate are also presented.
ACCESSION #
61180448

 

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