TITLE

Long-term survival and quality of life after cardiac resuscitation following coronary artery bypass grafting

AUTHOR(S)
Karhunen, Janne P.; Jokinen, Janne J.; Raivio, Peter M.; Salminen, Ulla-Stina
PUB. DATE
July 2011
SOURCE
European Journal of Cardio-Thoracic Surgery;Jul2011, Vol. 40 Issue 1, p249
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Abstract: Objective: Follow-up studies of patients surviving emergency resternotomy, open cardiac massage, and additional emergency cardiac surgery following coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) remain sparse and studies focusing on health-related quality of life are lacking. Our aim was to elucidate the long-term course of patients experiencing this hazardous complication. Methods: Between 1988 and 1999, 76 patients suffered sudden hemodynamic collapse following isolated CABG. All patients underwent emergency resternotomy and open cardiac massage. An emergency cardiac reoperation was performed in the 62 (82%) primary survivors. Additional 76 patients were pair-matched to the study patients on the basis of their preoperative characteristics and served as controls. Of the study patients, 41 (54%), and of the controls, 76, (100%) were discharged. In December 2009, all patients were traced with respect to mortality data and the health-related quality of life of living patients was studied using the RAND-36 Item Health Survey questionnaire. Results: Altogether 19 (73%) of the 26 study patients, and 38 (84%) of the 45 controls were available. After exclusion of the early deaths, the life expectancy was similar between the groups: neither overall (p =0.60) nor cardiac (p =0.64) survival differed significantly after a mean follow-up time of 15.1±3.5 years. In addition, cardiac re-interventions were equally frequently required in both the groups. The RAND-36 scores were congruent (p =ns) between the groups and the age- and sex-matched national reference population in the health-related quality-of-life dimensions describing physical, mental, and social domains. Conclusions: Patients who have survived severe hemodynamic collapse, open cardiac massage, and emergency cardiac reoperation following CABG achieve similar long-term prognosis in terms of survival and cardiac interventions as the pair-matched control patients. In addition, 15 years postoperatively, they have a good health-related quality of life, similar to that of an age- and sex-matched national reference population.
ACCESSION #
61175223

 

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