TITLE

Targeting the Mitochondrial Permeability Transition: Cardiac Ischemia-Reperfusion Versus Carcinogenesis

AUTHOR(S)
Javadov, Sabzali; Hunter, J. Craig; Barreto-Torres, Giselle; Parodi-Rullan, Rebecca
PUB. DATE
March 2011
SOURCE
Cellular Physiology & Biochemistry (Karger AG);2011, Vol. 27 Issue 3/4, p179
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Cardiovascular diseases and cancer continue to be major causes of death worldwide, and despite intensive research only modest progress has been reached in reducing the morbidity and mortality of these awful diseases. Mitochondria are broadly accepted as the key organelles that play a crucial role in cell life and death. They provide cells with ATP produced via oxidative phosphorylation under physiological conditions, and initiate cell death through both apoptosis and necrosis in response to severe stress. Oxidative stress accompanied by calcium overload and ATP depletion induces the mitochondrial permeability transition (mPT) with formation of pathological, non-specific mPT pores (mPTP) in the mitochondrial inner membrane. Opening of the mPTP with a high conductance results in matrix swelling ultimately inducing rupture of the mitochondrial outer membrane and releasing pro-apoptotic proteins into the cytoplasm. The ATP level is the determining factor in deciding whether cells die through apoptosis or necrosis. Cardiac cells undergoing ischemia followed by reperfusion (IR) possess exactly the same conditions mentioned above to induce mPTP opening. Due to its critical role in cell death, inhibition of mPTP opening has been accepted as a major therapeutic approach to protect the heart against IR. In contrast to cardiac IR, cancer cells exhibit less sensitivity to pore opening which can be in part explained by increased expression of mPTP compounds/modulators and metabolic remodeling. Since the main goal of chemotherapy is to provoke apoptosis, mPT induction may represent an attractive approach for the development of new cancer therapeutics to induce mitochondria-mediated cell death and prevent cell differentiation in carcinogenesis. This review focuses on the role of the mPTP in cardiac IR and cancer, and pharmacological agents to prevent or initiate mPT-mediated cell death, respectively in these diseases. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel
ACCESSION #
61161703

 

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