TITLE

PROTECTING RELIGIONS FROM "DEFAMATION": A THREAT TO UNIVERSAL HUMAN RIGHTS STANDARDS

AUTHOR(S)
LEO, LEONARD A.; GAER, FELICE D.; CASSIDY, ELIZABETH K.
PUB. DATE
March 2011
SOURCE
Harvard Journal of Law & Public Policy;Spring2011, Vol. 34 Issue 2, p769
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article discusses the efforts of the Organization of the Islamic Conference (OIC), composed of fifty-seven nations with Muslim majorities, for a law against defamation of religions to be passed in the U.N. (United Nations) Human Rights Council. The proposed resolution is analyzed and a conclusion presented that such a law will not solve the problems of religious persecution and discrimination. It calls for all U.N. members not to support the resolution as it is not in accordance with international standards on human rights.
ACCESSION #
61153443

 

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