TITLE

Conclusion

PUB. DATE
January 2008
SOURCE
Employment Effects of North-South Trade & Technological Change;2008, p14
SOURCE TYPE
Working Paper
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article focuses on the conclusion that technological changes and increasing (non-fuel) imports from developing countries had an effect of shifting labour demand towards higher skills.
ACCESSION #
61052232

 

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