TITLE

The Practice of Kindness in Early Modern Elite Society*

AUTHOR(S)
Pollock, Linda A.
PUB. DATE
May 2011
SOURCE
Past & Present;May2011, Vol. 211 Issue 1, p121
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article presents an examination of kindness, as it was practiced and as the term itself was used, in early modern elite society in England. It draws on familial letters and the literature that would have been read among elite members of English society in an effort to better understand the context in which the concept was used. It argues that kindness was used as a broad concept that encompassed goodwill, material aid and courtesy and was an important social value in governing spousal and kinship relations, friendship and Christian ethics.
ACCESSION #
61048400

 

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