TITLE

The Return of the Giant Ground Sloth

PUB. DATE
May 2011
SOURCE
Antique Shoppe Newspaper;May2011, Vol. 25 Issue 7, p26
SOURCE TYPE
Newspaper
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article reports that the Giant Ground Sloth has returned to the Museum of Arts and Sciences (MOAS) in Daytona Beach, Florida.
ACCESSION #
60818736

 

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