TITLE

What Argentinians Are Thinking

AUTHOR(S)
Ossa, Nena
PUB. DATE
July 1976
SOURCE
National Review;7/23/1976, Vol. 28 Issue 27, p790
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article examines the social and political conditions in Argentina under de facto President Jorge Videla in 1976. It presents an overview of the attitudes of the inhabitants of Buenos Aires toward the regime of Videla following his seizure of power through coup d'etat. It describes the social and economic implications of the proliferation of terrorist activities across the country. It also assesses the impact of the collapse of the democratic government on the reputation of the country abroad.
ACCESSION #
6079375

 

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