TITLE

Is Haig a Problem?

AUTHOR(S)
Buckley Jr., Wm. F.
PUB. DATE
May 1981
SOURCE
National Review;5/1/1981, Vol. 33 Issue 8, p508
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article comments on the displeasure displayed by U.S. Secretary of State Al Haig before a congressional committee following the attempted assassination of President Ronald Reagan in 1981. It explores the controversy over his reaction to the selection of Vice President George Bush as the one who is in charge of the crisis committee. It also describes his relationship with the president and enumerates his official responsibilities. It cites several factors which contributed to his reaction to the formation of a crisis management team.
ACCESSION #
6078824

 

Related Articles

  • LETTER FROM WASHINGTON.  // National Review;4/17/1981, Vol. 33 Issue 7, p399 

    The article reflects on the assassination attempt on U.S. President Ronald Reagan on March 30, 1981. It argues that this incident has implications for the political careers of Reagan and Bush. It describes the personal blunder of Secretary of State Alexander Haig during a press briefing on the...

  • Hearing and Believing. Kelly, James; Wierzynski, George // Time;1/19/1981, Vol. 117 Issue 3, p18 

    The article offers information on the choices of cabinet ministers of the newly elected U.S. President Ronald Reagan. Before finalizing with his choice of cabinet officers, he met privately with Republican Senators. He was grilled from the Democrats on the Senate Foreign Relations Committee. He...

  • "I AM IN CONTROL HERE": CONSTITUTIONAL AND PRACTICAL QUESTIONS REGARDING PRESIDENTIAL SUCCESSION. Erhart, David A. // University of Louisville Law Review;Winter2012, Vol. 51 Issue 2, p323 

    The article focuses on the provisions and history regarding presidential succession in the U.S. It provides the comments on the misstatement of U.S. Secretary of State Alexander Haig on the law that governs presidential succession, during the time that U.S. President Ronald Reagan was shot while...

  • LETTER FROM WASHINGTON.  // National Review;5/1/1981, Vol. 33 Issue 8, p466 

    The article comments on the conflict between U.S. State Secretary Al Haig and Richard Allen and its implications for U.S. foreign policy in 1981. It enumerates the differences between Haig and Allen on foreign policy issues such as the deployment of the neutron bomb. It comments on the action...

  • AL HAIG AL FRESCO.  // National Review;3/19/1982, Vol. 34 Issue 5, p318 

    The article comments on the leakage to the press of some of Secretary of State Alexander Haig's candid quotes on government policies during his private meetings in the U.S. Key issues discussed include Haig's reaction to the documentation of the private sessions, as well as an analysis of his...

  • LETTER FROM WASHINGTON.  // National Review;12/4/1987, Vol. 39 Issue 23, p14 

    Examines the possible 1988 Republican and Democrat candidates as seen in the wake of the stock-market crash of 1987. U.S. President Ronald Reagan with the most to lose and the least; Congressional Democrats to err if they gloat or point fingers; View that George Bush in inextricably linked to...

  • LETTER FROM WASHINGTON.  // National Review;12/4/1987, Vol. 39 Issue 23, p14 

    Examines the possible 1988 Republican and Democrat candidates as seen in the wake of the stock-market crash of 1987. U.S. President Ronald Reagan with the most to lose and the least; Congressional Democrats to err if they gloat or point fingers; View that George Bush in inextricably linked to...

  • LETTERS. Ahmed, Kamal // National Review;12/18/1987, Vol. 39 Issue 24, p6 

    Presents a letter to the editor commenting on Richard Brookhiser's analysis of Senate minority leader Robert Dole.

  • LETTER FROM WASHINGTON.  // National Review;12/4/1987, Vol. 39 Issue 23, p14 

    Examines the possible 1988 Republican and Democrat candidates as seen in the wake of the stock-market crash of 1987. U.S. President Ronald Reagan with the most to lose and the least; Congressional Democrats to err if they gloat or point fingers; View that George Bush in inextricably linked to...

Share

Read the Article

Courtesy of THE LIBRARY OF VIRGINIA

Sorry, but this item is not currently available from your library.

Try another library?
Sign out of this library

Other Topics