TITLE

The Exploding Duck and Other Primal Tales

AUTHOR(S)
Kenner, Hugh
PUB. DATE
October 1978
SOURCE
National Review;10/13/1978, Vol. 30 Issue 41, p1287
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article reports on several editorial cartoons and tales concerning politicians and various political events in the United States. It tells of interpretations of various cartoons and stories printed in newspapers and an overview of the cartoonists and their varying interpretations of political events. It mentions the implications for politics and political journalism.
ACCESSION #
6077948

 

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