TITLE

Change--A Little Bit at a Time A Review of that Change in the Area of Professional Responsibility

AUTHOR(S)
Thoman, Jay L.
PUB. DATE
March 2010
SOURCE
Army Lawyer;Mar2010, Issue 442, p78
SOURCE TYPE
Trade Publication
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article discusses the changes related to the professional responsibility of criminal law practitioners manifested in cases that present risks on the problems which involve ineffective assistance of counsel (IAC). It says that the rules which govern legal counsels' responsibility serve as a guidance for the practice of law of criminal lawyers. It examines the case U.S. v. Loving which warns the counsel in death penalty cases regarding mitigation experts use.
ACCESSION #
60765547

 

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