TITLE

The Sanctimony Ticket

PUB. DATE
August 1976
SOURCE
National Review;8/20/1976, Vol. 28 Issue 31, p880
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article comments on the Democratic ticket for the November 1976 elections. It claims that Senator Walter Mondale (D-Minn.) is a suitable running-mate for Democratic presidential nominee Jimmy Carter. It presents Mondale's opinion on U.S. President Gerald Ford and Republican presidential candidate Ronald Reagan. It argues that the Carter-Mondale campaign will rely heavily on the tactic of insinuation. Finally, it concludes that the virtue of the Democratic candidates are questionable and can become legitimate campaign issues by themselves.
ACCESSION #
6073994

 

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