TITLE

The Three-Way Race

PUB. DATE
June 1980
SOURCE
National Review;6/27/1980, Vol. 32 Issue 13, p764
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article looks at the chances of the three contenders for the Republican presidential nomination in 1980. It discusses the tactical problems confronted by Ronald Reagan and identifies the states which he can win. It also discusses the charm of the John Anderson's campaign strategy and claims that he has made good progress with Jews in New York and California. Finally, it identifies the assets of U.S. President Jimmy Carter's campaign and argues that he has the potential to become a more national candidate than the two.
ACCESSION #
6073690

 

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