TITLE

Are Christians Responsible?

AUTHOR(S)
Schwartz, Michael
PUB. DATE
August 1980
SOURCE
National Review;8/8/1980, Vol. 32 Issue 16, p956
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
This article examines the risks associated with the teaching of the Holocaust in U.S. schools in 1980. The author put emphasis on the potential effect of the teaching of the Holocaust on the relationship between Jews and Christians. In this regard, he argues that in order to efficiently teach the social event to students, research and teaching during the Nazi era should be enhanced. Hence, teachers should assess the views of Catholics on the religiosity of Hitler and examine the accounts on the condemnation of Nazism and antisemitism.
ACCESSION #
6072070

 

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