TITLE

The Current WISDOM

PUB. DATE
November 1981
SOURCE
National Review;11/13/1981, Vol. 33 Issue 22, p1324
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article analyzes the comments made by former U.S. National Security Council member Major General Robert L. Schweitzer on the strategic capability of the Soviet Union. Schweitzer claims that the Soviet Union is superior to the U.S. in nuclear weaponry. He believes that the Soviet Union will not invade Poland but instead will install a puppet despot to keep the country within the embrace of the Soviet Union. He explains that Soviet Union's superiority in nuclear weaponry could tempt it to attack the U.S.
ACCESSION #
6069735

 

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