TITLE

Eating Crow in California

AUTHOR(S)
Coyne Jr., John R.
PUB. DATE
July 1976
SOURCE
National Review;7/9/1976, Vol. 28 Issue 25, p724
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article discusses the presidential race in the U.S. in 1976. Despite Ronald Reagan's unprecedented showing in New Hampshire, it appeared to be holding true. Incumbent President Gerald Ford took Florida and then Illinois by ever-widening margins. After Illinois, many began to take Jimmy Carter seriously. Carter has acquired the Democratic Party's presidential nomination. His campaign in California was low-keyed, primarily a race against Frank Church for second place. In the meantime, the Ford campaign seems to flip-flop from week to week.
ACCESSION #
6067112

 

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