TITLE

State of the Union

AUTHOR(S)
McLaughlin, John
PUB. DATE
February 1983
SOURCE
National Review;2/18/1983, Vol. 35 Issue 3, p169
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article argues in favor of the State of the Union address delivered by U.S. President Ronald Reagan in 1983. It criticizes the reaction of the neo-populists to the State of the Union address. It discusses the advantages of the approach taken by Reagan to the issue of arms reduction over the one adopted by former President Jimmy Carter. It also describes the manner in which Democratic reactions to the State of the Union address were preempted by Reagan by clarifying significant political and social issues.
ACCESSION #
6060092

 

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