TITLE

Constitutional Nonsense

AUTHOR(S)
Oliver, Daniel
PUB. DATE
December 1977
SOURCE
National Review;12/23/1977, Vol. 29 Issue 50, p1493
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article focuses on a class action suit that has been filed by the New York Civil Liberties Union (NYCLU) regarding laws related to adoption in the U.S. According to the NYCLU, the five individual black children in whose names it brought suit, represented all those black children in New York City's child-care agencies whose legal relationship with their natural parents had been or could be terminated. The NYCLU claimed that, although adoptive homes could be found for such children, the child-care agencies intentionally kept them in foster care so as to collect the per-capita government subsidies.
ACCESSION #
6056790

 

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