TITLE

Carter Watch

PUB. DATE
October 1976
SOURCE
National Review;10/29/1976, Vol. 28 Issue 41, p1164
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article discusses developments in the campaign of U.S. Democratic presidential candidate Jimmy Carter as of October 1976. It discusses the impact of the resignation of U.S. Agriculture Secretary Earl Butz on Carter's candidacy. It looks at how Carter performed in pre-election polls vis a vis U.S. President Gerald Ford, who is running for re-election. It discusses the outcome of the second Ford-Carter debate. It ponders on the consequences of a possible Carter's defeat in the November 3 elections. Finally, it concludes that Carter's recent actions do not seem presidential.
ACCESSION #
6056620

 

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