TITLE

The Proposed Treaty: Preliminary Thoughts

PUB. DATE
September 1977
SOURCE
National Review;9/2/1977, Vol. 29 Issue 34, p981
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
This article discusses the proposed Panama Canal treaty to be signed by the U.S. and Panama. The Panama Canal is clearly an object of the national pride of the U.S. and rightly so. Conservatives must note that the present terms of the proposed treaty do not include any pejorative interpretation of American history. According to the treaty, the U.S. will be mainly responsible for defense of the canal until the year 2000 and can retain some of its military bases there. Panama will assume primary responsibility for defense of the canal in the year 2000. Panama will get substantial military assistance from the U.S.
ACCESSION #
6056222

 

Related Articles

  • The Canal: Interim Notes. Burnham, James // National Review;11/25/1977, Vol. 29 Issue 46, p1351 

    This article reflects on the new treaties regarding the Panama Canal that have been signed by the U.S. and Panama. A big debate has taken place over these treaties. The treaties are unsatisfactory from whatever side one looks at them. However, the treaties are the best the negotiators could have...

  • Has the Panama Canal a Future? Aragon, Leopoldo // New Republic;7/30/62, Vol. 147 Issue 4/5, p16 

    Focuses on the provisions of a bill introduced by U.S. Senator Warren G. Magnuson granting authorization to Panama Canal Co. to conduct preliminary surveys on possible sites for digging a canal between the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans citing political and economic relations between the two...

  • The Right to Intervene.  // National Review;11/25/1977, Vol. 29 Issue 46, p1347 

    The article focuses on international agreements between Panama and the United States regarding the protection of the Panama Canal's integrity. According to a joint statement issued by the governments of Panama and the U.S., none of the provisions of the Panama Canal treaties should be...

  • Treaty to facilitate the construction of a ship canal.  // Treaty to Facilitate the Construction of a Ship Canal;8/1/2017, p1 

    Presents the text of a 1902 treaty designed to facilitate the construction of the Panama Canal. Specifics of the treaty.

  • Canal Politics.  // National Review;11/11/1977, Vol. 29 Issue 44, p1282 

    The article discusses the problems faced by the 1977 Panama Canal treaties in the U.S. Senate and with the U.S. public opinion. Having these problems in mind, U.S. President Jimmy Carter has arranged a visit for Panamanian dictator General Omar Torrijos to the White House. The result was an...

  • How the Big Ditch Was Dug.  // Time;8/22/1977, Vol. 110 Issue 8, p18 

    The article offers information on how the U.S. canal treaty to Panama came to be. The participation and manipulation of French Bunau-Varilla on the completion of the Panamanian canal where the approval and acceptance of the treaty by the Panama and the U.S. is discussed. Bunau-Varilla who worked...

  • Halftime Confidence On Panama But opponents of the treaties still hope for a miracle.  // Time; 

    The article reports that while Democratic leaders were confident of a sure win in their 68-to-32 Senate majority in favor of the Panama Canal treaties, opponents promised to continue fighting against the second treaty that will turn over the canal to Panama by year 2000, which will be voted on...

  • Panama: The Enduring Irritant.  // Time;3/1/1976, Vol. 107 Issue 9, p26 

    The article focuses on the U.S. and Panama negotiations on Panama Canal treaty and the opposition on the negotiation of returning the sovereignty of the U.S. over the canal. According to Henry Kissinger, U.S. Secretary of State, the negotiations of the U.S. and Panama for the treaty are progress...

  • Notes and Comment.  // New Yorker;5/1/1978, Vol. 54 Issue 11, p31 

    The article comments on the statement of Brigadier General Omar Torijos Herrera, the head of state of Panama, regarding the passage of the Panama Canal Treaty. He explained that his would have liberated the Canal if the treaty was rejected or if any unacceptable amendment was attached to it....

Share

Read the Article

Courtesy of THE LIBRARY OF VIRGINIA

Sorry, but this item is not currently available from your library.

Try another library?
Sign out of this library

Other Topics