TITLE

KISSINGER'S UNNOTICED NOTICE

PUB. DATE
May 1978
SOURCE
National Review;5/26/1978, Vol. 30 Issue 21, p673
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article reports on the foreign policy statement of Henry Kissinger, the United States' State Secretary. He discussed the issues concerning the negotiations between the United States and the Soviet Union. The situation of Cuba and South Africa are also discussed. He also mentioned the geopolitical strategy of the Soviet Union towards the Middle East and South Africa.
ACCESSION #
6047554

 

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