TITLE

Once Again: Coverup

PUB. DATE
July 1975
SOURCE
National Review;7/18/1975, Vol. 27 Issue 27, p761
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article criticizes the perceived coverup of atrocities happening in the 20th century. The news of atrocities comes despite the efforts of the rulers of the new order to control all that is said in, and about, the country they rule. It is opined that the Western press to attend the few witnesses available and to search for confirmation, disproof, qualification of their stories.
ACCESSION #
6045991

 

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