The Social Composition of the Cathedral Church of St Mungo in Late Nineteenth-Century Glasgow

Hillis, Peter
May 2011
Journal of Scottish Historical Studies;2011, Vol. 31 Issue 1, p46
Academic Journal
The article examines the religious congregation associated with the Cathedral Church of St. Mungo in Glasgow, Scotland, giving particular attention to the Cathedral members' economic and social status. The economic effects caused by the removal of the University of Glasgow from the Cathedral's neighborhood are therefore documented. The importance of religion and church membership to Glasgow's middle class during the city's late 19th-century growth is also explained, along with the relationship between church officials and the Cathedral's congregation.


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