TITLE

Azorean Hopes and Sorrows

PUB. DATE
July 1975
SOURCE
National Review;7/4/1975, Vol. 27 Issue 25, p706
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article focuses on communism in Portugal. The Azores are a group of nine islands in the Atlantic Ocean, 1,000 miles west of Europe and 2,000 miles east of America. The Azoreans do not want to have anything to do with communism or communists. They have been disappointed with the communization of Portugal. A rapidly increasing number of Azoreans want to break away from the mainland and set out on a free and independent course. Recently, a number of Azoreans demonstrated against Portugal's communist policies.
ACCESSION #
6045336

 

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