TITLE

Acoustic harmonic generation measurement applications: Detection of tight cracks in powder metallurgy compacts

AUTHOR(S)
Barnard, D. J.; Foley, J. C.
PUB. DATE
May 2000
SOURCE
AIP Conference Proceedings;2000, Vol. 509 Issue 1, p1401
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Standard linear ultrasonic testing techniques have long been employed for locating and characterizing relatively open cracks in a wide variety of materials, from metallic alloys and ceramics to composites. In all these materials, the detection of open cracks easily accomplished because the void between the two crack surfaces provides sufficient acoustic impedance mismatch to reflect the incident energy. Closed or partially closed cracks, however, may often go undetected because contacting interfaces allow transmission of ultrasound. In the green (unsintered) state, powder metallurgy compacts typically contain high residual stresses that have the ability to close cracks formed during the compaction process, a result of oxide films, improper powder lubricant, mold design, etc. After sintering, the reduction of residual stresses may no longer be sufficient to close the crack. Although the crack may be more easily detected, it is obvious most desirable to discover defects prior to sintering. It has been shown that the displacements of an interface may be highly nonlinear if a stress wave of sufficient intensity propagates across it, a result of the stress wave either opening or closing the interface. Current efforts involve the application of nonlinear acoustic techniques, in particular acoustic harmonic generation measurements, for the detection and characterization of tightly closed cracks in powder metallurgy parts. A description of the equipment and the measurement technique will be discussed and initial experimental results on sintered and green compacts will be presented.—This work was performed at the Ames Laboratory, Iowa State University under USDOE Contract No. W-7405-ENG-82. © 2000 American Institute of Physics.
ACCESSION #
6029243

 

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