TITLE

The HERMES experiment

AUTHOR(S)
Milner, Richard G.
PUB. DATE
June 2000
SOURCE
AIP Conference Proceedings;2000, Vol. 512 Issue 1, p339
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The study of the spin structure of the nucleon is a fundamental problem in strong interaction physics. The HERMES experiment at DESY, Hamburg, Germany is carrying out measurements to probe the spin structure of the nucleon using a new technique. Polarized internal gas targets of hydrogen, deuterium, and [sup 3]He are used with the 27.5 GeV longitudinally polarized positron (or electron) beam of the HERA collider to measure both inclusive and semi-inclusive spin-dependent deep-inelastic scattering from the nucleon. In addition, HERMES has observed a negative spin asymmetry in the photoproduction of hadron pairs with high transverse momenta. This is interpreted as the first direct experimental evidence for a positive gluon polarization in the nucleon. The azimuthal single-spin asymmetry measured in semi-inclusive pion production at HERMES is presented and interpreted as an effect of a new T-odd fragmentation function. HERMES also has carried out precision measurements of the ratios of unpolarized nuclear cross-sections. The data indicate a sizable nuclear dependence in the ratio of longitudinal to transverse cross-sections at low Q[sup 2]. © 2000 American Institute of Physics.
ACCESSION #
6028170

 

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