TITLE

The BLS pilot survey of training in industry

AUTHOR(S)
Neary, H. James
PUB. DATE
February 1974
SOURCE
Monthly Labor Review;Feb74, Vol. 97 Issue 2, p26
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Presents the results of the pilot survey conducted by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics on occupational training in various industries in 1970. Classification of establishments responding to pilot mail survey; Training reported in pilot mail survey by purpose and type; Comparison of responses to mail survey with those in response analysis.
ACCESSION #
6013405

 

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