TITLE

EDUCATION LEVELS AND UNEMPLOYMENT IN ASIAN COUNTRIES

AUTHOR(S)
Evans Jr., Robert
PUB. DATE
November 1973
SOURCE
Monthly Labor Review;Nov73, Vol. 96 Issue 11, p58
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Discusses the relation between education levels and unemployment in Asian countries. Solution to unemployment problems and encouragement of economic growth; Unemployment rates; Japan's labor market; India's labor market.
ACCESSION #
6006898

 

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